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Microsoft Outlines Evolved Security, Privacy and Reliability Strategies for Cloud and Big Data

Tuesday, February 28, 2012 11:50 AM


Trustworthy Computing Next advocates for continued focus amid new computing inflection points.

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 28, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Today at the RSA Conference 2012, Scott Charney, corporate vice president of Microsoft Trustworthy Computing,shared his vision for the road ahead as society and computing intersect in an increasingly interconnected world. In a new paper, "Trustworthy Computing (TwC) Next," Charney encouraged industry and governments to develop more effective privacy principles focused on use and accountability, improve end-to-end reliability of cloud services through increased fault modeling and standards efforts, and adopt more holistic security strategies including improved hygiene and greater attention to detection and containment.

(Logo:  http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20000822/MSFTLOGO)

Ten years ago, the computing ecosystem was at a crossroads when Bill Gates introduced TwC and called for industry collaboration. Today, technology and society are more interconnected than ever. Big data's strain on privacy protection, the shifting relationship between government and the Internet, and the evolving threat model all raise new challenges for industry and governments globally.

"We are at another inflection point, with expectations for better security, privacy and reliability growing at an exponential rate," Charney said. "Now is the time for industry and governments to develop and adopt strategies and policies that balance business and societal needs with individuals' choices."

The Cloud and Big Data

The proliferation of devices and cloud services has resulted in a massive aggregation of global data, also known as big data. While offering many potential societal benefits, this collection of data poses unique challenges. From a security perspective, big data represents a valuable target for attackers. As the cloud and devices become more integrated with society, people also become increasingly dependent on the reliability and availability of data and services to function. Finally, the massive increase in the amount and types of data available for collection, analysis and dissemination has strained traditional rules to protect privacy.

One solution for the privacy challenge is for government, industry, academia and consumer groups to collaborate in updating current privacy principles to address the world of big data. These revised principles should place a greater focus on appropriate uses of data. They should also include an "accountability" principle to help ensure organizations use and protect data in ways consistent with individual and societal expectations. Together, these principles can help reduce the burden on the consumer and shift greater responsibility to the data collector.


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