logo
  Join        Login             Stock Quote

Stronger Shark Finning Ban Endorsed in Landslide Vote by European Parliament

Thursday, November 22, 2012 8:42 AM


STRASBOURG, France, Nov. 22, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Conservation groups are celebrating today's European Parliament vote to close loopholes in the European Union ban on shark finning (slicing off a shark's fins and discarding the body at sea), the culmination of six years of campaigning and debate.  Members of the European Parliament voted 566-47 in favor of the European Commission's proposal to impose the best practice for finning ban enforcement: a prohibition on removing shark fins at sea. The measure faced formidable opposition from representatives of Spain and Portugal, Europe's leaders in catch of oceanic sharks.

"Parliament's overwhelming support for strengthening the EU finning ban represents a significant victory for shark conservation in the EU and beyond," said Ali Hood, Shark Trust Director of Conservation. "Because of the EU's influence at international fisheries bodies, this action holds great promise for combating this wasteful practice on a global scale."

The EU banned finning in 2003, but the associated regulation includes loopholes that allow shark fins to be removed on board and landed separately from shark bodies, which hampers enforcement.   

"We owe so much of our success to the tens of thousands of divers across Europe who voiced their concern for sharks," said Suzanne Pleydell, Director for Project AWARE Foundation in Europe. "By demonstrating the economic benefits of sound shark stewardship, divers brought new EU Member States to the debate to support a stronger finning policy that reflects the values of the entire European Union, not just its shark fishing powers."

Parliament's final report now goes to the EU Council of Ministers and Commission as part of the process to finalize the regulation. Conservation groups stressed that finning bans alone are insufficient to save sharks.

"Strong finning bans are fundamental to effective shark fisheries management and particularly important for shark fishing powers like the EU, but our work is far from done," said Sonja Fordham, President of Shark Advocates International. "We urge swift finalization of the amended finning regulation, and remain committed to securing additional, complementary safeguards including science-based limits on shark catch and trade."

The groups are turning their sights to the next big battleground for sharks: the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species whose Parties meet in March to consider proposals to list commercially valuable, threatened shark species, including porbeagles, hammerheads, and oceanic whitetips.  Proponents for listing include the EU and U.S.

(Source: PR Newswire )
(Source: Quotemedia)

Advertisement
Advertisement



Fundamental data is provided by Zacks Investment Research, and Commentary, news and Press Releases provided by YellowBrix and Quotemedia.
All information provided "as is" for informational purposes only, not intended for trading purposes or advice. iStockAnalyst.com is not an investment adviser and does not provide, endorse or review any information or data contained herein.
The blog articles are opinions by respective blogger. By using this site you are agreeing to terms and conditions posted on respective bloggers' website.
The postings/comments on the site may or may not be from reliable sources. Neither iStockAnalyst nor any of its independent providers is liable for any informational errors, incompleteness, or delays, or for any actions taken in reliance on information contained herein. You are solely responsible for the investment decisions made by you and the consequences resulting therefrom. By accessing the iStockAnalyst.com site, you agree not to redistribute the information found therein.
The sector scan is based on 15-30 minutes delayed data. The Pattern scan is based on EOD data.