logo
  Join        Login             Stock Quote

How To Get Some Of The Highest Yields In The World For As Little Risk As Possible

 April 20, 2012 10:27 AM


(By Street Authourity) Here's an old Wall Street saying that investors should "Sell in May and go away." While there's no identifiable rationale to explain why that should be good advice, there is an element of empirical truth. A study by Plexus Asset management shows that since 1950 the returns for the S&P 500 in the months of November through May were 8.1%, compared with just 2.4% for the period from May through October. (James Brumley, one of our talented analysts, recently warned investors about putting too much stock in this, though. Go here to read his take.)

The MSCI World Index, a popular index of global stock market performance, shows a similar seasonal pattern. In fact, returns for the MSCI World Index in the months of May through October over the same post-1950 era are negative. The old adage to sell in May has gained even more prominence over the past two years, as stocks have endured gut-wrenching corrections in the summers of 2010 and 2011, only to enjoy powerful year-end and New Year rallies.

I'd never recommend managing your portfolio using simplistic seasonal rules, but it's only prudent for investors to contemplate the potential for at least a short-term correction in global equity markets.

After all, for most global markets, the first quarter of 2012 was the best first-quarter showing since 1998. And the powerful global rally in risky assets of all stripes -- stocks, commodities, corporate and sovereign bonds -- suggests that the market is pricing in a lot sunnier outlook for the global economy today than it was six months ago.

Stocks certainly seem set up for at least a mild sell-off in May.

In my High-Yield International newsletter, one of the ways I manage risk in my portfolios is to own a number of low-beta stocks.


Next Page >>12
iOnTheMarket Premium
Advertisement

Advertisement


Post Comment -- Login is required to post message
Name:  
Alert for new comments:
Your email:
Your Website:
Title:
Comments:
 

rss feed

Latest Stories

article imageShould You Invest In The Hottest New Trend In Finance?

Thanks to major changes in regulation, social media and technology, the business of banking has undergone read on...

article imageStrong Attractor in Action Pulling S&P 500 Down

The attractor is formed by the 200-day moving average and the 50% Fibonacci retracement of the up move from read on...

article imageIs The Weak Housing Market A Warning Sign For The US Economy?

Today’s US economic releases – housing starts and business survey data for the manufacturing sector – read on...

article imageShort-term Pullback or Something Worse?

A few weeks ago when we called for a short-term pullback of 4 to 5%, it was due solely to the short-term read on...

Advertisement
Popular Articles

Advertisement
Daily Sector Scan
Partner Center



Fundamental data is provided by Zacks Investment Research, and Commentary, news and Press Releases provided by YellowBrix and Quotemedia.
All information provided "as is" for informational purposes only, not intended for trading purposes or advice. iStockAnalyst.com is not an investment adviser and does not provide, endorse or review any information or data contained herein.
The blog articles are opinions by respective blogger. By using this site you are agreeing to terms and conditions posted on respective bloggers' website.
The postings/comments on the site may or may not be from reliable sources. Neither iStockAnalyst nor any of its independent providers is liable for any informational errors, incompleteness, or delays, or for any actions taken in reliance on information contained herein. You are solely responsible for the investment decisions made by you and the consequences resulting therefrom. By accessing the iStockAnalyst.com site, you agree not to redistribute the information found therein.
The sector scan is based on 15-30 minutes delayed data. The Pattern scan is based on EOD data.