logo
  Join        Login             Stock Quote

Sell In May And Go Away? Not This Year

 May 02, 2012 09:03 AM
 


(By Frank Holmes) One catchy investing maxim that's popular this time of year is "sell in May and go away," the notion that investors should cash in their investments and take the summer off. Historically, this hasn't been a bad strategy. You can see from this chart that June, July, August and September have been the worst four months of the year for the S&P 500 Index since 1988.

Since 2000, the June-September period for the S&P 500 is split. Half of the years saw positive returns, while the other half were negative. Historically, you have only about a fifty-fifty chance for a positive gain during those months while your odds are roughly 10 percent better during the rest of the year.

[Related -Stocks Bounce On Strong GDP Report]

The trend is less consistent for emerging market stocks. You can see that the median monthly return for the MSCI Emerging Markets Index since 1988 is negative for June and August, but positive for July and September. The frequency of positive returns during the June-September period is roughly 6 percent lower than the rest of the year.

[Related -9 Stocks That Have Paid Dividends For Over 100 Years]

Last year, investors who employed the "sell in May" strategy averted an almost 17 percent drop in the S&P 500 and a nearly 25 percent drop in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index from June-September. Summer of 2010 was a similar experience.

With last year fresh on the minds of investors, should they take this summer off? We don't think so.

We believe it's a much better market this year. After following a similar trajectory as the previous year from October to the beginning of March, improving economic data pushed the S&P 500 over 3 percent higher in March 2012 after trending sideways during the same time period last year.

Real GDP in the U.S. grew 2.2 percent during the first quarter of 2012 versus 0.4 percent during the first quarter of 2011, and several areas of the economy are much stronger than they were a year ago. Nonfarm payrolls (up 29 percent), ISM Manufacturing (up 2 percent) and auto sales (up 8 percent) have all improved from a year ago, according to J.P. Morgan. In fact, auto sales are currently at a four-year high.

More importantly, the U.S. housing sector continues to improve.


Next Page >>123
iOnTheMarket Premium
Advertisement

Advertisement


Post Comment -- Login is required to post message
Name:  
Alert for new comments:
Your email:
Your Website:
Title:
Comments:
 

rss feed

Latest Stories

article imageCrude Rebound

Since the price of crude oil broke below $90 per barrel in September, the Brent global benchmark has been read on...

article imageShould You Invest In The Hottest New Trend In Finance?

Thanks to major changes in regulation, social media and technology, the business of banking has undergone read on...

article imageStrong Attractor in Action Pulling S&P 500 Down

The attractor is formed by the 200-day moving average and the 50% Fibonacci retracement of the up move from read on...

article imageIs The Weak Housing Market A Warning Sign For The US Economy?

Today’s US economic releases – housing starts and business survey data for the manufacturing sector – read on...

Advertisement
Popular Articles

Advertisement
Daily Sector Scan
Partner Center



Fundamental data is provided by Zacks Investment Research, and Commentary, news and Press Releases provided by YellowBrix and Quotemedia.
All information provided "as is" for informational purposes only, not intended for trading purposes or advice. iStockAnalyst.com is not an investment adviser and does not provide, endorse or review any information or data contained herein.
The blog articles are opinions by respective blogger. By using this site you are agreeing to terms and conditions posted on respective bloggers' website.
The postings/comments on the site may or may not be from reliable sources. Neither iStockAnalyst nor any of its independent providers is liable for any informational errors, incompleteness, or delays, or for any actions taken in reliance on information contained herein. You are solely responsible for the investment decisions made by you and the consequences resulting therefrom. By accessing the iStockAnalyst.com site, you agree not to redistribute the information found therein.
The sector scan is based on 15-30 minutes delayed data. The Pattern scan is based on EOD data.